We're hiring

We love digital - Call
03332 207 677
and say hello - Mon - Fri, 9am - 5pm

Call 03332 207 677

Stephen Logan

Unique Descriptive Keywords Added to Google Maps Listings

14th Jun 2011 News, Industry News, SEO, Local Search 1 minute to read

If you have seen a few extra words crop up in your Google Maps listing, you’re not hallucinating. The latest in a long series of tweaks has seen the search engine integrate descriptive keywords into the SERPs listing.

This new feature, which is simply a number of descriptive words or phrases, is designed to make a business stand out. Therefore it will look to highlight the terms that best describe an individual company, rather than the more generalised keywords you can expect to see in SERPs.

So for instance, a florist may simply have a listing with their business name and a customer review. However now, in the UK and US at least, they could also have “tropical plant importer”, “wedding bouquets” or “beautiful arrangements” added. So if a customer is searching on Google and is particularly looking for someone who can provide a wedding bouquet in their area, they may be more likely to visit.

There is no single source for these keywords. Instead Google pools information from reviews, websites and “other online references” – at least that’s what is being reported on the Small Business Blog.

WebProNews raised a very interesting point, which essentially relates to the potential use of negative keywords. For instance, if the term “dead flowers” was used repeatedly in describing the previously mentioned hypothetical florist, would this appear within the listing? Whilst that may be accurate in terms of what people are saying, it certainly wouldn’t do the business any favours.

Crowd-sourcing information from the wider web is certainly a great way of finding information that is relevant to the searcher and avoiding well worn SEO-style phrases that a site owner might employ. It’s unlikely to have a huge impact on the overall click through rate of a listing and only appears to impact Maps listings (therefore shouldn’t affect your rankings elsewhere). However, it should help to improve the quality of clicks that you receive and assist in making your listing stand out where it’s needed most.

As with any Google roll-out though, there are still a fair few questions that need to be answered, and no doubt there will be a good number of businesses that aren’t entirely happy with it. Fortunately this is only a subtle update, but of course, as it is Google, it’s something that you should certainly be watching out for.

Share this post

1 Comment

What do you think?

  • aspect-ratio
    Dan Rice

    What is the Difference Between Owned, Earned and Paid Media

    Search engine technology is evolving, and so is the digital marketing industry. The more experienced professionals amongst you may remember the days of gleefully stuffing keywords into your copy to boost your rankings, blindly spamming strangers to join your email lists and easily securing media coverage for your thinly veiled advertisements.

    (more…)

    Dan Rice
    @iamdanrice
    16th Aug 2018
    Content Marketing
  • aspect-ratio site-speed-blog
    Ross Momtahan

    A Guide To Page Speed Metrics

    Site speed is an important area of website optimisation that people working in the world of Search Engine Optimisation are becoming increasingly concerned about.

    With Google’s site speed update being rolled out to all users on July 9th, now is the time to audit your site speed if you haven’t done it for a while. (more…)

    Ross Momtahan
    20th Jul 2018
    SEO

Digital Ideas Monthly

Sign up now and get our free monthly email. It’s filled with our favourite pieces of the news from the industry, SEO, PPC, Social Media and more. And, don’t forget - it’s free, so why haven’t you signed up already?
  • We’ve got some really cool stuff we want to share with you. So you don’t miss out, let us know which of the following you want us to email you about going forward:
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.