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James Perrin

Search Engine Market Share Statistics – March 11

15th Mar 2011 News, Industry News 1 minute to read

This month, Bing was the biggest winner as Google saw more reductions on both sides of the Atlantic. Whilst the erosion of search market dominance might be fractional, it will make for pleasant reading at Microsoft HQ.

Looking at the UK statistics, figures from Hitwise have revealed that Google still dominate the market. However a monthly reduction from 90.39% in January to 90.16% in February means that 0.23% volume of search has been dropped.


As a result, Bing and Yahoo have been able to pounce, with a monthly volume increase of 0.07% and 0.08% respectively. To put this into some kind of perspective, this represents an overall share of 4.19% and 2.94%, in comparison to Google’s 90.13%. However the overriding trend, certainly in recent months,  is that Google are slowly losing market share, with their rising competitor, Bing, being one of the direct beneficiaries.

This trend is similar in the US, but even more significant.


According to the latest figures from ComScore, Google’s market share dropped 0.20% from 65.60% in January to 65.40% in February. The figures were very similar for Ask who also experienced a drop of 0.20% from 3.40 % in January to 3.20% in February.

With Yahoo and AOL both experiencing monthly search volume stagnation, staying at 16.10% and 1.70% of the search market respectively, it means the combined 0.40% dropped by Google and Ask was as a result of Bing’s continued rise. This month they saw a rise in search volume of 0.50% from 13.10% in January to 13.60% in February.

Bing has been building in increments this year and is starting to get a little traction, or so it would appear[as indicated in Search Engine Market Share Statistics – January 2011]. Whilst it may only be in fractions of a percent, this is a huge slice of traffic to be gaining when put in real terms. It’s difficult to see when this trend may reverse or plateau, but certainly for the time being Bing will be much the happier – even if they are still a long way behind Google.

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